Royal Sscribe's Stuff

mucholderthen:

Vintage Veterinary Anatomical Illustrations 
Exquisitely detailed by German medical illustrator Hermann Dittrich
from University of Wisconsin Digital Collections

The University of Wisconsin’s digital library has 80 scanned images from classic works of German veterinary anatomists, Wilhelm Ellenberger and Hermann Baum, and medical illustrator, Hermann Dittrich.

The texts, from which these illustrations were derived, are works published in 1898 and from 1911 through 1925, all entitled Handbuch der Anatomie der Tiere für Künstler which can be translated as Handbook (or Atlas) of Animal Anatomy for Artists.

The illustrations are of the horse, cow, dog, lion, goat, deer [and roe deer].

SOURCE:  Veterinary Anatomical lllustrations

A tip of the hat to cvinceillustration, by way of scientific illustration, for posting some of Hermann Dittrich’s other illustrations, which led me eventually to this collection.  These illustrations have also been used in Wikipedia articles (for example).

pkmn-r-my-patronus:

jellybabiesandjammiedodgers:

apathbetweenthestars:

Source

brb drowning myself in the toilet

ladies and gentlemen, presenting the stupidity and stubbornness that those of us who work in retail must endure daily.

susemoji:

home of many classics, such as Spit It And Away and Howl’s Moving Car Sale

susemoji:

home of many classics, such as Spit It And Away and Howl’s Moving Car Sale

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

[source]

???The source never says that the tree is actually upside down.
"Just a few feet away from the Dutch elm is one of its cousins — but looking at the two, you would never know they’re related. This tree is often referred to as the “upside-down tree” by students, as its branches resemble roots. The reason for the unusual shape comes from its cultivation method: rather than sprouting from a seed, this tree grows from a Camperdown elm cutting that’s grafted onto the trunk of a Wych elm.Tag no. 5844, south pocket garden behind Irving K. Barber Learning Centre”
It only says that it’s branches RESEMBLE roots. Camperdown branches just naturally look sort of like roots when they shed their leaves :\
leaf off

leaf on

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. 
Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. 

You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.

Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

image

[source]

???
The source never says that the tree is actually upside down.

"Just a few feet away from the Dutch elm is one of its cousins — but looking at the two, you would never know they’re related. This tree is often referred to as the “upside-down tree” by students, as its branches resemble roots. The reason for the unusual shape comes from its cultivation method: rather than sprouting from a seed, this tree grows from a Camperdown elm cutting that’s grafted onto the trunk of a Wych elm.
Tag no. 5844, south pocket garden behind Irving K. Barber Learning Centre”

It only says that it’s branches RESEMBLE roots. Camperdown branches just naturally look sort of like roots when they shed their leaves :\

leaf off

leaf on

danissohothewasonfire:

trustthedoctors:

rachelrahrah:

kickingpjbecauseheisntmine:

run-from-my-past:

askgangsterthor:

katesgotabow:

shieldagentmaller:

orithyea:

prnd:

Keeping this… forever…
Excuse me as I copy this down. :o

keeping for reference



I’ve had one of these since high school. My English teacher was adamant about never using said unless we had to.

omg…this is so…amazing… 

for the people who write and only say “he said”, “she said”, “they said”… ugh

GOD BLESS THIS

OMG can someone please show this to people in my English classes

A gift to fellow rpers 

GOD BLESS YOU

danissohothewasonfire:

trustthedoctors:

rachelrahrah:

kickingpjbecauseheisntmine:

run-from-my-past:

askgangsterthor:

katesgotabow:

shieldagentmaller:

orithyea:

prnd:

Keeping this… forever…

Excuse me as I copy this down. :o

keeping for reference

image

I’ve had one of these since high school. My English teacher was adamant about never using said unless we had to.

omg…this is so…amazing… 

for the people who write and only say “he said”, “she said”, “they said”… ugh

GOD BLESS THIS

OMG can someone please show this to people in my English classes

A gift to fellow rpers 

GOD BLESS YOU

tanzaniteflight:

For those that don’t know animation software, 3D animated characters typically have to be manually posed using a combination of both interactive pivots and graphed coordinates for every individual one of those pivots, rendered out, then played back in order to get an idea of what the final animation will look like, and you wouldn’t even be able to see his fur. 

Pixar’s in-house animation program, Presto, as demonstrated above, not only plays those animations back in real time, but also plays back with all 3 million strands of Sulley’s fur visible. 

To give you an idea of how much computer memory this takes, Monsters University’s final render, after the lighting process, was 20 gigabytes per frame. There are 24 frames in one second of animation.

nbchannibal:

Important things that happen on Hannibal tonight.

nbchannibal:

Important things that happen on Hannibal tonight.

thecoletrainbaby:

hey i just met you

and this is crazy

but i see your text post

and holy shit i wish i could make you feel better oh my god i am so sorry you’re having a bad day gODDAMNIT WHAT DO I DO TO FIX THIS

reallyreallyreallytrying:

medusa, trying to turn you to stone, but you accidentally called her “melissa” when you first walked in and now you’re too embarrassed to look at her. “it’s alright” she keeps saying “i get it all the time” but you still won’t look. u don’t even remember the stone thing until later

typhonatemybaby:

mishawinsexster:

Friendly reminder that the Duckbill Platypus is not beaver sized but the tiniest most cutest patootie being in existence 

OH GOD

i thought these things were the size of like, large cats or something. ITS FUCKING TINY JESUS

braydaaan:

"Study" they say, "How to study" they don’t say.

il-tenore-regina:

thalensis:

[Image description: Helen Keller sits by a radio, with her hand over it, in order to feel the vibrations of the music playing]
Helen Keller wrote the following letter to the New York Symphony Orchestra in 1924, describing listening to the “Ninth Symphony” composed by Beethoven - who was also deaf - over the radio: 

“Dear Friends:
I have the joy of being able to tell you that, though deaf and blind, I spent a glorious hour last night listening over the radio to Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony.” I do not mean to say that I “heard” the music in the sense that other people heard it; and I do not know whether I can make you understand how it was possible for me to derive pleasure from the symphony. It was a great surprise to myself. I had been reading in my magazine for the blind of the happiness that the radio was bringing to the sightless everywhere. I was delighted to know that the blind had gained a new source of enjoyment; but I did not dream that I could have any part in their joy. Last night, when the family was listening to your wonderful rendering of the immortal symphony someone suggested that I put my hand on the receiver and see if I could get any of the vibrations. He unscrewed the cap, and I lightly touched the sensitive diaphragm. What was my amazement to discover that I could feel, not only the vibration, but also the impassioned rhythm, the throb and the urge of the music! The intertwined and intermingling vibrations from different instruments enchanted me. I could actually distinguish the cornets, the roil of the drums, deep-toned violas and violins singing in exquisite unison. How the lovely speech of the violins flowed and plowed over the deepest tones of the other instruments! When the human voices leaped up thrilling from the surge of harmony, I recognized them instantly as voices more ecstatic, upcurving swift and flame-like, until my heart almost stood still. The women’s voices seemed an embodiment of all the angelic voices rushing in a harmonious flood of beautiful and inspiring sound. The great chorus throbbed against my fingers with poignant pause and flow. Then all the instruments and voices together burst forth – an ocean of heavenly vibration – and died away like winds when the atom is spent, ending in a delicate shower of sweet notes.
Of course this was not “hearing,” but I do know that the tones and harmonies conveyed to me moods of great beauty and majesty. I also sense, or thought I did, the tender sounds of nature that sing into my hand-swaying reeds and winds and the murmur of streams. I have never been so enraptured before by a multitude of tone-vibrations.
As I listened, with darkness and melody, shadow and sound filling all the room, I could not help remembering that the great composer who poured forth such a flood of sweetness into the world was deaf like myself. I marveled at the power of his quenchless spirit by which out of his pain he wrought such joy for others – and there I sat, feeling with my hand the magnificent symphony which broke like a sea upon the silent shores of his soul and mine.” 


This woman just described the art of music more perfectly than most hearing musicians.

il-tenore-regina:

thalensis:

[Image description: Helen Keller sits by a radio, with her hand over it, in order to feel the vibrations of the music playing]

Helen Keller wrote the following letter to the New York Symphony Orchestra in 1924, describing listening to the “Ninth Symphony” composed by Beethoven - who was also deaf - over the radio: 

“Dear Friends:

I have the joy of being able to tell you that, though deaf and blind, I spent a glorious hour last night listening over the radio to Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony.” I do not mean to say that I “heard” the music in the sense that other people heard it; and I do not know whether I can make you understand how it was possible for me to derive pleasure from the symphony. It was a great surprise to myself. I had been reading in my magazine for the blind of the happiness that the radio was bringing to the sightless everywhere. I was delighted to know that the blind had gained a new source of enjoyment; but I did not dream that I could have any part in their joy. Last night, when the family was listening to your wonderful rendering of the immortal symphony someone suggested that I put my hand on the receiver and see if I could get any of the vibrations. He unscrewed the cap, and I lightly touched the sensitive diaphragm. What was my amazement to discover that I could feel, not only the vibration, but also the impassioned rhythm, the throb and the urge of the music! The intertwined and intermingling vibrations from different instruments enchanted me. I could actually distinguish the cornets, the roil of the drums, deep-toned violas and violins singing in exquisite unison. How the lovely speech of the violins flowed and plowed over the deepest tones of the other instruments! When the human voices leaped up thrilling from the surge of harmony, I recognized them instantly as voices more ecstatic, upcurving swift and flame-like, until my heart almost stood still. The women’s voices seemed an embodiment of all the angelic voices rushing in a harmonious flood of beautiful and inspiring sound. The great chorus throbbed against my fingers with poignant pause and flow. Then all the instruments and voices together burst forth – an ocean of heavenly vibration – and died away like winds when the atom is spent, ending in a delicate shower of sweet notes.

Of course this was not “hearing,” but I do know that the tones and harmonies conveyed to me moods of great beauty and majesty. I also sense, or thought I did, the tender sounds of nature that sing into my hand-swaying reeds and winds and the murmur of streams. I have never been so enraptured before by a multitude of tone-vibrations.

As I listened, with darkness and melody, shadow and sound filling all the room, I could not help remembering that the great composer who poured forth such a flood of sweetness into the world was deaf like myself. I marveled at the power of his quenchless spirit by which out of his pain he wrought such joy for others – and there I sat, feeling with my hand the magnificent symphony which broke like a sea upon the silent shores of his soul and mine.” 

This woman just described the art of music more perfectly than most hearing musicians.

gallifrey-feels:

thecodeinecowboy:

Notice how if we were to stop arguing about who’s right or wrong we could pretty much change the world.

an ye harm none do what you will